Van-Lear Eckert
Experienced Southern Illinois Attorney
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Congressional rule bans discrimination against LGBTQ staff

| Jan 17, 2019 | Employment Law |

Individuals often look to the federal government for guidance and clarity on how best to manage the many laws and policies that govern Americans everyday life. The world is forever changing, and it can be hard for Illinois residents to stay ahead of the many important social, economic, and political movements that drive change in their communities. It is therefore to the government that many look for an example of how to approach living justly in this country.

The federal House of Representatives recently set a historic example for the nation when it passed an internal rule to ban discrimination against individuals of the LGBTQ community who wish to work in its hallowed halls. Individuals who fall into this population are often protected by state laws but are not currently included in any federal anti-discrimination in employment legislation that applies to the federal government. The move ensures that individuals who wish to serve members of Congress in the House of Representatives may do so regardless of their inclusion in the LGBTQ population.

Being a member of a protected group when it comes to employment discrimination can give a person certain rights to stop the harassment they suffer at work or to advocate for fair treatment when it comes to their hiring, firing, or employment rights. For too long LGBTQ individuals have suffered unjustly but now, hopefully, their rights will be more widely recognized.

Employment discrimination against LGBQT individuals is unfortunately common, and those who have suffered it should know that they may have legal rights and options. Their trusted employment law attorneys can advise them of how best to address the employment-based discrimination they have suffered and to push for fair treatment under the law.